Why Report Hate Crime?

Why report hate crime? This simple question is the underlying question when you first hear about the Federal Hate Crimes bill. The language of the Federal Violence Against Women Act speaks directly to these issues, as the legislation provides definitions for the phrase “hate crime.”

What is a Hate Crime?

What is a hate crime

A hate crime is the crime of a person due to the victim’s race, religion, national origin, ethnicity, disability, or sexual orientation. There are three states which allow the creation of “hate crimes” that fall under the laws that apply to crimes against persons. Some examples of crimes where there is no person being hurt are: domestic violence, sexual assault, battery, stalking, harassment, and vandalism. The offenses include but are not limited to, hate crimes on a person for their color, sexual orientation, ancestry, gender, or disability.

The Hate Crimes acts are actually a result of the outgrowths of the Rights Protection Acts and the Hate Crimes records act. The two acts attempt to protect people from crimes against them due to their race, religion, ethnicity, disability, or sexual orientation. Of course, the legislation does not apply to any crimes against a person because of their color, national origin, sexual orientation, gender, or age.

At first, the act focused solely on crimes against persons due to their race, religion, national origin, ethnicity, or disability. However, in 2020, Congress decided to expand the Federal government hate crimes laws to apply to any kind of crime. The expansion of the laws increased the ability to protect people from crimes of every kind.

A hate crime is the crime of a person due to the victim’s race, religion, national origin, ethnicity, disability, or sexual orientation. There are three states which allow the creation of “hate crimes” that fall under the laws that apply to crimes against persons. Some examples of crimes where there is no person being hurt are: domestic violence, sexual assault, battery, stalking, harassment, and vandalism.

Victims of the crime are allowed to come forward. The main thing that you have to do is to file a report with the local police or the local prosecuting attorney.

If the victim is pregnant, a defendant can be civilly committed. A civil commitment is the removal of the defendant from society. If you find that you are a victim of a hate crime, be sure to contact your local police department.

After the release of the Hate Crimes Act, there were several changes made to the entire legislature. However, the first new legislation was in the courts. To address the dilemma, the hate crimes laws made revisions.

The harassment law was rewritten to include people who were not actually the victim of the crime. In other words, it included incidents that occurred between neighbors or between people who were not even in the same building. The new law also made it a crime for a person to sue a person because of this law.

There are some cases when a hate crime can be much more serious. Sometimes the assault or battery is a very strong argument. The emotional and physical abuse can show that a person’s victim is not a valued member of society.